Personalize a Favorite Look

Your home is your sanctuary- your safe place in which you can be completely and totally you. So shouldn’t you infuse your surroundings with things that are a true reflection of you and your lifestyle? Maybe you have a favorite look or style that you love, such as white kitchens and a monochromatic color scheme.

HOWEVER, that is NOT the only look out there. Frankly, I have to caution people sometimes that you don’t want to look like everyone else…do you? You can take that look to the next level by just popping it with one major splash of color or something completely different … your signature, on a room. A monochromatic look is lovely but if everyone gets that look, it can be a bit monotonous and sometimes even boring. If you aren’t careful, you will look like everyone else…let’s face it, you AREN’T everyone else! And why would you want to be?

How do you take a look that you love and make it your own? Well, color and accessories are a beginning. To keep the look fresh and not too jumbled, pick one color to pop—orange, turquoise, lime green, and yellow are all the rage right now. This strong color contrast will set you apart from others and will allow your personality to shine through. Pillows, large color vases, and amazing art are just a few other ways to make your room your own. Don’t be afraid, but be careful not to overdo if you still want a more monochromatic space—just a few areas will do the trick.

If you don’t want color, add texture. Texture adds another depth and layer to the space. When doing a monochromatic space, remember to add different values of the color you are working with. Light color to dark add contrast and interest.

One of my favorite ways to add a unique and personalized factor to a room is lighting. I am a sucker for exquisite lighting. That doesn’t mean it has to be expensive but unique. I would rather have no lighting than boring lighting or lighting that everyone has. Save your monies for fabulous! Plus, fabulous lighting can always go with you when you sell your home. It doesn’t have to stay. Just make sure you remove it before you put your home on the market. Otherwise, it can become a bargaining element when selling the house. Everyone loves fabulous lighting.

Hire a professional even if it is just for a couple of hours. It is worth the money. A second set of eyes can put a whole new perspective on your project. It will help you see other options and give you ideas you haven’t even thought of.

Originaly Published 12:00 am CST, Sunday, January 6, 2019 on chron.com

How Italy Taught Me to Refute Throw Away Culture

Before my last year of college, I had the opportunity to spend my summer studying abroad in Florence, Italy. I was more than excited to spend the summer in my dream locale, but little did I know I would be experiencing a culture that would help shape my style as a designer. I had studied most of the famously historic architecture that the country had to offer, but being able to see the structures in person, walk through them, be surrounded by them, and touch their walls, brought a whole new sense of meaning to my thoughts on design. It wasn’t just the famous buildings, like the Duomo and Palazzos, that changed my perspective, but the buildings I saw everyday as I walked through the narrow city streets. The centuries old buildings that are now being used as apartments, restaurants, schools, and shops were what really opened my eyes to a different way of living.

Shops and restaurants
Shops and restaurants are found below apartments with original architecture.

In America we currently exist in a “throw away” culture, meaning most things we use everyday are not meant to last. We are so accustomed to throwing something away when it has served its purpose or when the next new shiny thing on the market has come along. It’s not just iPhones and material objects that we upgrade every few years but also things that are meant to last, like cars, houses, and buildings. The reason for this is partially due to the lack of quality in the initial construction of these things, but it is also because of our mindset of wanting everything to be new and representative of the current year. This “throw away” culture has allowed for many buildings and homes to be torn down, only to be replaced by new and modern designs. Don’t get me wrong, I’m all for modern design and function, but I don’t appreciate how our society views older things as useless and ugly. In the design industry we should be striving to create things that will not only be functional, but will also stand strong to stand the test of time.

The Duomo
The Duomo was undergoing construction during my time in Florence. It undergoes regular maintenance to keep the exterior looking as it originally did the 1400s.

When talking about “throw away” culture, Italians couldn’t be any more opposite. They built with a purpose of creating lasting architecture and they’ve clearly succeeded. Construction on the Florence Cathedral and Duomo began in 1296 and wasn’t completed until 1436. The architects and workers took plenty of time to have the structure completed in a way that would last centuries, which it has. The building that my school resided in was converted from a centuries old apartment style home. Even the basement apartment that I lived in was from the early 1900’s and had been recently updated. Despite the updates being made on these types of apartment buildings, the original architecture and style is still able to shine through. Italians celebrate their history and the architecture that goes along with it. They are constantly surrounded by their heritage through the buildings they work, dine, and live in. This is the type of culture that inspires me when I look at designing for our clients, specifically with remodels.

We do a lot of remodels here at Eklektik, and we get clients who either want to totally gut the space and start new or ones who want to keep existing elements of the home. More often than not though, they are on the side of totally gutting the space. I would like to inspire our clients to think about what aspects of their home originally drew them towards purchasing it—which elements they fell in love with. Then it’s our job to figure out how to incorporate those existing elements into the new design. Even if it’s something as simple as the existing molding or built in shelving, these elements can maintain the original charm that the home has to offer.

Historic architecture and charm
A beautiful example of a modern apartment home with historic architecture and charm.

We also do plenty of new construction at Eklektik, where we work with builders and/or a client from the ground up. In these instances we can utilize this same idea of refuting throw away culture, by building with a purpose to last. This means we need to design with the future in mind. What current trends will still work in the years to come? What materials will last for years without needing to be replaced or upgraded? These are the questions we consider when designing new builds.

This idea of refuting throw away culture won’t be accepted by everyone, but we can progress the movement by encouraging homeowners to preserve some of the initial design brought to life by the original architects and by designing and building quality, lasting structures. I’m thankful for my experience in Italy and how it opened my eyes to a new culture with new ways of thinking and living. Specifically how it taught me to appreciate the care and detail that goes into creating beautiful lasting architecture. One day I hope to own a home that has been thoughtfully designed, with unique characteristics of the time in which it was built, but that allows me to meld in my own style seamlessly.

High Point Market: Top Five Trends

Designers Cristine Navarrete and Emily Stinemetz Share Their Perspective as First Time Market Goers


Twice a year the small town of High Point, North Carolina goes from ghost town to mecca for interior designers as 75,000 visitors flock to the largest home furnishings trade show in the world.  High Point Market is the energetic center of new and exciting design trends as designers connect with vendors in their furniture and décor showrooms.

You, our fabulous clients, are the reason Eklektik Interiors sends designers to market every year. We go to discover the new products and trends in interior design, so we can incorporate them into our designs and offer them in our showroom.

As a designer, going to market was not only exciting, it was beneficial to see and touch the furniture pieces and products that we specify in our projects. We were able to experience the quality first hand and visualize how a furniture piece would work into a certain project.  Each vendor showroom is styled so nicely with interesting design elements, which gave us new ideas and inspiration. We also truly got a feel for the branding and style of each vendor and what they are trying to convey.

One of the most exciting parts of going to Market is being a part of the new product introductions that vendors unveil in their showrooms.  Let us share what we discovered as we explored High Point Market this fall!

Top 5 Trends at Market:

  1. Rounded/Curved Sofas and Chairs
  2. Floating Flowers on Water – A very zen element that is easy to incorporate as décor around your home
  3. Indoor Wicker Furniture – Almost looks like outdoor furniture, but with a twist
  4. Mixed Materials – Mixing of different materials, such as different fabrics or metals with leather, to create a unique look
  5. Conversation Pieces – Chairs that are formed in a way that it helps people hold a conversation