Maximalist Vs. Minimalist: A Conversation with Designer Kathy Anderson

There is no place like a home that functions for you on every level.  Does your current interior design reflect you and the way you want to live? Do you prefer simple lines and a monochromatic color scheme, following the minimalism trend? Or do you prefer something more bold, bright and colorful, leaning toward a maximalist approach?  Kathy Anderson, founder and principal designer of Eklektik Interiors, takes a very personal and customized approach to her designs.  She believes there is room for both minimalist and maximalist persuasions in a home, and she is a master at blending the lines between styles.

Minimalism:

“Great design can be lost with all of the ‘stuff’ we surround ourselves with,” Anderson explains.  Minimalism is focused on what is absolute in terms of need and function.  It simplifies your life and your home by eliminating the unnecessary visual noise and highlighting a few great pieces. “When a space is beautifully designed and curated,” Anderson says, “less can definitely be more.”

Her favorite part of incorporating minimalism:  Helping clients go thru their belongings and simplifying their lives by keeping only those items that really mean something. Thoughtful curation tells a meaningful story.

Her favorite space for minimalist design:  I prefer a minimalist approach in personal and intimate spaces. I think that is important because everyone needs a place to retreat to find solace and comfort from the hectic world that we live in.

Maximalism:

“Modern Maximalism is more about personalization than perfection,” says Anderson. Maximalism is comfortable and livable without being messy or random.  There is an art to it.  It is dramatic, colorful, and outside the box, but is not cluttered, garish, or overly done.  A lot of books, art, accessories, fabrics, and textures can be displayed with purpose and thought in a personalized style that is dramatic and fun. “That’s the great thing about design,” says Anderson. “Rules are made to be broken but with careful consideration. There can be a fine line between fabulous and frightful.”

Her favorite part of incorporating maximalism:  Solidifying the space with rich color for a dramatic background to pop the bright colors, textures, and collectibles.

Her favorite space for maximalist design:  Living spaces, a study, or a home bar are fun places to add color and showcase curated collections.  These spaces can function for gathering and spending time with family and friends, while also telling a client’s unique story.

The most important part of Anderson’s job is highlighting the function of a space and aligning it with the lifestyle of each client. “That is what I love about what I do,” says Anderson,  “every engagement is different because every client is different. They are each unique in how they live, what makes them tick, and what brings them joy.” Whether a client prefers a minimalist or maximalist approach or a combination of both, Anderson strives to satisfy each client’s needs so their homes enrich their lives.

How Italy Taught Me to Refute Throw Away Culture

Before my last year of college, I had the opportunity to spend my summer studying abroad in Florence, Italy. I was more than excited to spend the summer in my dream locale, but little did I know I would be experiencing a culture that would help shape my style as a designer. I had studied most of the famously historic architecture that the country had to offer, but being able to see the structures in person, walk through them, be surrounded by them, and touch their walls, brought a whole new sense of meaning to my thoughts on design. It wasn’t just the famous buildings, like the Duomo and Palazzos, that changed my perspective, but the buildings I saw everyday as I walked through the narrow city streets. The centuries old buildings that are now being used as apartments, restaurants, schools, and shops were what really opened my eyes to a different way of living.

Shops and restaurants
Shops and restaurants are found below apartments with original architecture.

In America we currently exist in a “throw away” culture, meaning most things we use everyday are not meant to last. We are so accustomed to throwing something away when it has served its purpose or when the next new shiny thing on the market has come along. It’s not just iPhones and material objects that we upgrade every few years but also things that are meant to last, like cars, houses, and buildings. The reason for this is partially due to the lack of quality in the initial construction of these things, but it is also because of our mindset of wanting everything to be new and representative of the current year. This “throw away” culture has allowed for many buildings and homes to be torn down, only to be replaced by new and modern designs. Don’t get me wrong, I’m all for modern design and function, but I don’t appreciate how our society views older things as useless and ugly. In the design industry we should be striving to create things that will not only be functional, but will also stand strong to stand the test of time.

The Duomo
The Duomo was undergoing construction during my time in Florence. It undergoes regular maintenance to keep the exterior looking as it originally did the 1400s.

When talking about “throw away” culture, Italians couldn’t be any more opposite. They built with a purpose of creating lasting architecture and they’ve clearly succeeded. Construction on the Florence Cathedral and Duomo began in 1296 and wasn’t completed until 1436. The architects and workers took plenty of time to have the structure completed in a way that would last centuries, which it has. The building that my school resided in was converted from a centuries old apartment style home. Even the basement apartment that I lived in was from the early 1900’s and had been recently updated. Despite the updates being made on these types of apartment buildings, the original architecture and style is still able to shine through. Italians celebrate their history and the architecture that goes along with it. They are constantly surrounded by their heritage through the buildings they work, dine, and live in. This is the type of culture that inspires me when I look at designing for our clients, specifically with remodels.

We do a lot of remodels here at Eklektik, and we get clients who either want to totally gut the space and start new or ones who want to keep existing elements of the home. More often than not though, they are on the side of totally gutting the space. I would like to inspire our clients to think about what aspects of their home originally drew them towards purchasing it—which elements they fell in love with. Then it’s our job to figure out how to incorporate those existing elements into the new design. Even if it’s something as simple as the existing molding or built in shelving, these elements can maintain the original charm that the home has to offer.

Historic architecture and charm
A beautiful example of a modern apartment home with historic architecture and charm.

We also do plenty of new construction at Eklektik, where we work with builders and/or a client from the ground up. In these instances we can utilize this same idea of refuting throw away culture, by building with a purpose to last. This means we need to design with the future in mind. What current trends will still work in the years to come? What materials will last for years without needing to be replaced or upgraded? These are the questions we consider when designing new builds.

This idea of refuting throw away culture won’t be accepted by everyone, but we can progress the movement by encouraging homeowners to preserve some of the initial design brought to life by the original architects and by designing and building quality, lasting structures. I’m thankful for my experience in Italy and how it opened my eyes to a new culture with new ways of thinking and living. Specifically how it taught me to appreciate the care and detail that goes into creating beautiful lasting architecture. One day I hope to own a home that has been thoughtfully designed, with unique characteristics of the time in which it was built, but that allows me to meld in my own style seamlessly.